Engineers Bungalow

The Chief Engineers Bungalow

The Chief Engineers Bungalow
The Chief Engineers Bungalow

The Engineers Bungalow at the Marconi Station was a u shaped single storey structure. The engineer’s bungalow was the largest residence on site at the Marconi Station.  The building housed the chief engineer who engineered the Marconi stations day to day running operations.  The building consisted of 12-14 rooms which included a drawing room, offices and living quarters.  The engineer’s bungalow was surrounded below the towering transmitter masts which were 200-300 metres in height and sighted nearby towards the quarry and receiving house with the narrow gauge railway servicing between the structures.  Alcock and Brown in 1919 also visited the engineer’s bungalow after they crash landed in 1919.  The Chief engineer came from England and his name was Mr Entwhistle.  The chief

Engineer had responsibility for the other engineers and maintenance men that worked also on the day to day running of the Marconi Station operations.  There were a total of nine to ten engineers and maintenance men on site during the Marconi Stations operations.  The chief engineer also sometimes maintained the operations of the aerial masts during routine servicing. At the grounds of the engineers bungalow there was a tennis court adjacent to the front of the building.  The tennis court was used regularly by workers and the chief engineers friends and families during time of recreation and rest.  At the back of the engineers bungalow enclosed a 2-3 foot walled fruit and vegetable garden.  Also a wooden storage shed for peat was situated enclosed beside the garden. The chief engineer had its own gardener to maintain and grow vegetables, fruit etc. The engineer’s bungalow also had a conservatory located to the front of the building to allow natural sunlight shine through large glass windows all year round.  The building was well ventilated throughout.

Every room in the building had its own solid fuel open fireplace.  The building consisted of 4-6 domestic fire chimneys which were red brick material.  The walls of the building were of concrete plaster and white washed in appearance.  The roof surrounding the building was of roof tile structure made of chalk or wooden slate material.  The grounds and building had a 2-3 foot fence surrounding the building in terms of security and privacy. The chief engineer lived by himself most of the time due to the nature and sometimes dangerous tasks involved during the Marconi Stations function. The inside of the building also had the facility to electrify lighting throughout the rooms. The engineer’s bungalow was destroyed by 1922 during the Irish Civil War and subsequently not habitable.

Engineers Bungalow c.1911-13